Conference Programme



Day 1: Wednesday 13 February

NETWORKING BREAKFAST: Join us on the opening morning for our complimentary networking breakfast!
08:15 - 08:55

Opening Session
09:00 - 16:30

Moderator

Steve Sokolsky
Program manager
Calstart
USA

09:00

Decarbonization of non-road machinery – scenarios for CO2

Alex Woodrow
Managing director
Knibb Gormezano and Partners
UK
This presentation will review the challenges for mass-market non-road segments, and provide an assessment of market segmentation and customer requirements. It will also discuss the impact of technology transfer from the CV segment and implications for engine and driveline.

09:30

Advanced engine architecture for on and off-road reduced emissions

Larry Fromm
Executive vice president
Achates Power
USA
With the advent of more stringent Tier 5 emissions regulations coupled with serious concerns raised by diesel emission compliance cheating incidents, the backbone diesel engine is facing significant challenges in meeting ever more demanding air quality and climate goals. One extremely promising technology – opposed piston engines – may alter that trajectory and create a new path forward for diesel. Achates Power has added state-of-the-art control systems and aftertreatment to the opposed piston design, leading to Class 8 engines capable of increasing best-in-class efficiency by 15% while still reducing NOx emissions by 90% under USEPA standards. This engine is already used in industrial applications and could become the future platform for competitive industrial vehicles. This presentation reviews the current status of the engine in military, truck and industrial uses and future pathways.

10:00

Off-highway vehicle powertrains: what is the best energy source?

Colin Garner
Professor of applied thermodynamics
Loughborough University
UK
The presentation will compare IC engine, hybrid and battery-electric powertrains. The focus is non-tethered, mobile off-highway machines, but the analysis approach is applicable to other types of vehicles. It will discuss: global and local emissions (e.g. Stage V); energy and power; a direct numerical performance and cost comparison between IC engine/IC engine-hybrid and pure battery-electric powertrains based on current and future technology; the utility of diesel fuel and IC engines; and energy production method choices. It will finally seek to answer the fundamental question: "Off-highway vehicle powertrains: what is the best energy source?".

10:30 - 11:00

Break

11:00

Advanced model-based development – an approach to deal with future powertrain needs

Philip Scarth
Head of basic technologies
FPT Powertrain Technologies
SWITZERLAND
Today, the future powertrain requirements for the industrial goods sector are far from clear. We are moving away from the relatively simple world, where one technology would fit most of its needs, to a much more complex environment where the optimum choice of subsystems can be different for each application, mission and customer. To handle this level of complexity, FPT is taking a model-based development approach into its complete product development process. The involves not only an increase in the front loading of validation to support the design process, but also extending the use of the same high-fidelity models, backed up by physical validation, to accelerate SW development, testing, application and release.

11:30

Is there room for gasoline in a future industrial powertrain?

Dr Ryan Roecker
Powertrain control manager, automotive propulsion department
Southwest Research Institute
USA
With increased concern over air quality and CO2 emissions, regulation of industrial and off-highway equipment will increase. Already, the EU and other regulatory bodies are beginning to examine even lower NOx and PM regulations. Traditionally, the torque and reliability of a diesel engine have made it the favored powerplant for industrial applications. However, the combination of advanced engine hardware and expensive, bulky aftertreatment systems makes the diesel engine of the future considerably more expensive – both to buy and operate – and challenging to package. Southwest Research Institute has been working on solutions for high-efficiency gasoline engines for the passenger car market and, based on these developments, has identified a technology package that is very attractive for large (> 110mm bore) displacement gasoline engines that run along the same torque curve as a diesel engine. The concept, called Dedicated EGR, uses a ‘donor cylinder’ model of EGR production, but with the addition of running the donor cylinder with excess gasoline. The gasoline is converted into H2 and CO, both of which improve the dilution tolerance and knock resistance of the engine. The combination of high EGR rates and the knock resistance of the reformatted fuel add up to an engine with the potential to meet or beat diesel efficiency, depending on the ultimate displacement and specific power targets of the engine. This talk will cover the basics of Dedicated EGR and show some examples from large- and small-displacement engines to demonstrate the efficiency potential of the engine.

12:00

Hydraulic power for the digital age

Dr Niall Caldwell
Managing director
Artemis Intelligent Power Ltd
UK
How can we enable automation, dramatically reduce fuel consumption and downsize the engines of off-highway vehicles – at a price the market can afford? Artemis has a radical answer: its Digital Displacement technology now enables hydraulics to compete with electric technology for efficiency and digital control. Both excavator and forklift application demonstrators have shown improvements of 20-40% over conventional systems, with potential for even more. Cooperating with Danfoss and local partner RFE, Artemis is now embarking on a major £22m project, supported by the UK Advanced Propulsion Centre, to bring the benefits of this technology to the off-highway market.

12:30 - 13:45

Lunch

Moderator

Steve Sokolsky
Program manager
Calstart
USA

13:45

What does the future powertrain look like?

Philippa Oldham
Head of national network programs
Advanced Propulsion Centre
UK
What opportunities are there for engineering companies as they transition from internal combustion engines to hybrids and electric alternatives? This presentation will take a focussed look at some of the key needs for the power electronics, e-machines and batteries used within these solutions. Providing some insight into challenges currently faced by the industry from targets for cost, energy and power density. Solutions for our future powertrains will need a greater emphasis placed on materials and manufacturing processes reflecting their importance in delivering cost competitive and sustainable solutions.

14:15

New powertrain solutions for industrial application

John Bennett
Chief technology officer and vice president of global product strategy
Meritor
USA
Driven by legislation, lower battery costs, and packaging flexibility, electrified powertrains are fast becoming a viable technology for commercial and industrial vehicles. This presentation will examine how the emerging electric drivetrain trend will disrupt the business practices of existing OEMs and suppliers and create the need for completely new powertrain solutions.

14:45

A system engineering approach to fully integrated electric axles for heavy vehicles

Shaun Mepham
Chief engineer for electric vehicle systems
AxleTech
USA
Commercial vehicles are about to enter a new phase of powertrain development, offering all day electric range with series electric and battery electric powertrains for on- and off-highway applications. This presentation will present integrated electrified drive axle solutions for the platforms and outline the performance capabilities of such vehicles.

15:15 - 15:45

Break

Joint panel to be held in the Electric & Hybrid conference room - Offenbachsaal - Level 1

15:45 - 16:30

Panel Discussion - Bringing together the 'Electric & Hybrid' and 'Powertrain' audience to discuss - 'Engineering challenges transitioning from traditional IC powertrains to electrification and hybridization'

Panel Moderator:

Steve Sokolsky
Program manager
Calstart
USA

Panelists:

Shaun Mepham
Chief engineer for electric vehicle systems
AxleTech
USA
John Bennett
Chief technology officer and vice president of global product strategy
Meritor
USA
Philip Scarth
Head of basic technologies
FPT Powertrain Technologies
SWITZERLAND
Thomas Woopen
Vehicle development engineer for electrification
AVL Tractor Engineering Germany GmbH
GERMANY

Drinks Party - held in IVT Expo hall 11.1

Day 2: Thursday 14 February

Welcome Refreshments
08:15 - 08:55

Session Opens
09:00 - 16:30

Moderator

Joachim Stieler
Managing director
STM Stieler
GERMANY

09:00

What future opportunities are there for developments in thermal propulsion systems over the next 20 years?

Philippa Oldham
Head of national network programs
Advanced Propulsion Centre
UK
This talk will draw on the UK’s Automotive Council thermal propulsion systems roadmaps developed by the APC. This introduces stretched targets for future light- and heavy-duty systems, focusing on a wider emissions spectrum to maintain market relevance and competitiveness. Recognizing that the internal combustion engine needs to remain part of the system, its performance and compliance with regulation are dependent on the integration of pre- and post-combustion subsystems. Alternative operational cycles through alternative engine designs and control systems are highlighted in the roadmap, but with a stronger recognition of the integration of transmissions and energy recovery devices to further enhance hybrid system performance.

09:30

Poclain Hydraulics AddiDrive for heavy commercial vehicles

Bruno Lacheteau
Director - truck and bus markets
Poclain Hydraulics
FRANCE
Since 2005, Poclain Hydraulics' heavy commercial vehicle offering has consistently evolved. Now available at many European manufacturers, more than 20,000 vehicles use AddiDrive, a hydraulic hybrid transmission that transfers torque to a non-mechanically powered axle only when needed. AddiDrive augments the efficiency and safety of trucks used in construction, forestry and municipal applications, while making them more economical and environmentally friendly. AddiDrive helps users who face last-mile traction problems to maximize uptime and payload. In addition to the technical solution, Poclain now offers co-marketing services to support a successful product launch and manufacturers' sales efforts.

10:00

Innovative new hydraulic motors

Dierk Peitsmeyer
Product portfolio manager
Bucher Hydraulics
GERMANY
Hydraulic motors provide highest power density and very compact dimensions in comparison with electric motors. Hydraulic motors do not require an external cooling system, unlike e-motors. Today hydraulic motors are noisy, do not provide optimal efficiency, have torque pulsations at very low rpm and have problems starting under high load. To overcome these disadvantages, Bucher Hydraulics has developed new motors with innovative design: lowest torque ripple for smoothest rotation at low rpm, highest mechanical efficiency provides stick-slip free starts, highest total efficiency saves energy – and all this with low noise. New Bucher Hydraulics motors are very compact and offer new design options.

10:30 - 11:00

Break

11:00

Why produce cooling systems in Europe for off-highway machines?

Anders Felling
Business unit director
Ymer Technology AB
SWEDEN
Ymer Technology's mission is creative engineering to meet customers’ demands for the future. With its extensive expertise in design and manufacturing of customized cooling systems, Ymer is now investing in new production and testing facilities in Sweden. The investment will put Ymer closer to the OEMs in Europe and offer efficient global footprint and global solutions. The investment will significantly decrease the lead time to customers and offer the possibility to optimize the production process of cooling systems with new design and engineering concepts. Production in Europe will also be 'green' and significantly reduce the CO2 footprint of Ymer’s products.

11:30

IC cooling systems – optimization

Tomasz Turek
R&D manager business unit Poland, segment leader electric vehicles
Enterex International
POLAND
Even though currently the biggest new trend is electrification, there are still many applications where pure-electric solutions are not meeting requirements and it is imperative to use internal combustion engines with gearbox, or electric powertrain (hybrid solution). This situation, especially with increasing emission norms, challenges engineers to pay considerable attention to energy consumption and proper definition of requirements in order to minimize overdesign for a cooling system. Together with a more holistic approach for prototype testing and monitoring, we are able to define proper operation scenarios and optimize final solutions that not only ensure proper system cooling but also consume as little energy as possible.

12:00

Development of a hydraulic hybrid transmission for heavy-duty vehicles

Norman Grant
Director of engineering and technology
MISER Technologies - Ducere Holdings (Pty) Ltd
SOUTH AFRICA
This paper will outline the progress on a novel diesel-hydraulic hybrid for heavy trucks, which is being rolled out for selected clients. The system has 'regenerative braking' and 'engine optimization' abilities. The means to achieve these fuel-saving abilities will be explained in general terms from selected examples. The presentation will discuss selected projects and the results achieved to date. This will include the results from a controlled environment like the Gerotek test track in South Africa and the results achieved in pilot projects in the real world. There will be examples of the various layouts and configurations.

12:30 - 14:00

Lunch

Moderator

Joachim Stieler
Managing director
STM Stieler
GERMANY

14:00

What do innovative technologies mean for future hydraulics for mobile working machines?

Joachim Stieler
Managing director
STM Stieler
GERMANY
Future technologies for mobile working machines (i.e. construction, agricultural and material handling machines) are not confined to substitution of the IC engines. They also include new technologies for the driveline and working functions. We will see electric transmissions substituting existing transmissions, for example existing CVTs by E-CVTs, and new electrohydraulic solutions. This will have an impact on the existing hydraulic pumps and valves business. But with these new technologies, engineering will have much more freedom in machine design. The presentation will give examples of new technologies and new machine concepts. A case study will summarize the presented topics.

14:30

Increasing driveline efficiency in articulated dump trucks

Éanna Timoney
Director
Timoney Technology
IRELAND
An essential element of the overall efficiency of the driveline is the percentage of the tractive effort at the wheel that is translated into tractive force at the tyre/terrain surface interface – the contact patch. No matter what the engine-to-road/off-highway wheel efficiency is, the driveline efficiency is zero if the wheels are spinning. Maintaining maximum tyre/terrain contact is the function of the suspension. This paper describes the effects of different innovative designs on driveline/machine efficiency, and the proposed guidelines that might be adopted to assist driveline designers in maximising driveline efficiency while conforming to legislative requirements.

15:00 - 15:30

Break

15:30

Much lower emissions and costs for LPG-fueled range extenders

Rubens Basaglia
Project manager
X-Tech R&P SA
SWITZERLAND
The presentation discusses the development of close-to-zero-emissions variable-speed range extenders for electric/electrified vehicles, as well as heavy-duty and marine vehicles, utilizing an innovative liquid LPG common-rail injection system on Otto cycle gas engines. Such a solution realizes much simpler, smaller and cheaper power packs, due to the utilization of smaller three-way catalysts. It also meaningfully reduces maintenance costs and enables the use of a much less expensive and more abundant fuel such as LPG.

16:00

The dangers of aeration and how to test for it

Anthony Khoraych
President
Advanced Test & Automation
CANADA
Aeration is deadly for engine components as air contamination in oil can cause thermal degradation to occur – ultimately causing varnish, sludge and carbon insolubles to form. Previously, the only way to test for aeration-induced failures was through hot engine (dyno) testing or in the vehicle. Understanding the aeration rate was a time-consuming and expensive endeavor. Now, new robust and accurate methods are available to measure the aeration rate under specific conditions and simulate the aeration rate to induce the failure modes caused by entrained and dissolved air in hydraulic fluids.
 More papers to follow. Updates coming soon

Please Note: This conference programme may be subject to change

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